Universal Life Church/ULC Seminary Forum Home: Points To Ponder Lesson 16 - Universal Life Church/ULC Seminary Forum Home

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Points To Ponder Lesson 16

#1 User is offline   drlmorris 

  • Member
  • Icon
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 24
  • Joined: 11-October 05
  • Location:United States

Posted 24 September 2009 - 10:46 AM

Please enter your answers to the questions given in this lesson here.
Instructor: Master of the Historical Jesus
Founder: The Historical Jesus Project
0

#2 User is offline   graham 

  • Member
  • Icon
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 59
  • Joined: 22-April 08

Posted 04 April 2010 - 08:33 AM

1. It is very clear from reading the teachings of Jesus that he is attempting to rebut the notion, frequently expressed, that the coming of the Kingdom can be foretold and brought about by observation. In Luke, 17 - 20, he states unequivocally that, 'The kingdom of God does not come with your careful observation'. Elsewhere, he makes clear that the kingdom will not be of the apocalyptic nature that many anticipate on the basic of prophecy over many years; in John, 3-3, he says that 'no-one can see the kingdom of God unless he is born again', and in Matthew 12-28, he says, 'But if I drive out demons by the spirit of God, then the kingdom of God has come upon you'. The suggestion here is quite plainly that the kingdom will come about as result of individual receptivity towards God's grace and the intercession of Jesus and will certainly not take the form of a festive jamboree of the sort suggested by the advocates of the 'rapture'. 'Watchfulness', as defined in Luke 12-35, is more a state of spiritual readiness rather than an active sentry duty based upon imminent expectation of the coming of the kingdom.

2. Jesus is surely anxious to make a distinction between the angry (some might almost say, petulant) God of the Hebrew scriptures) and the God of compassion and mercy whom he is seeking to extol. Although it is still made clear that 'not everyone who says to me, Lord, Lord, will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of my Father which is in heaven' (Matthew 7 - 21), the emphasis is on forgiveness and the desire of God to redeem rather than to punish. There is not, however, a complete break with the retributive God of past 'times', as indicated in Luke 12, 8-10 and many other sections; the emphasis, however, is upon the individual and his/her receptivity towards the message of Jesus and the precepts that he preaches rather than the ethos of collective errancy and collective punishment which characterises much of God's dealings with the children of Israel in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Please note: points 2 and 3 are conflated here as they cover the same ground.)

3. In Luke 21, 5 - 36, Jesus expatiates at length about the time frame for the coming of the kingdom. He predicts wars, revolutions, persecutions, the fall of Jerusalem, earthquakes, famines and pestilence. In verse 8, he warns, 'Watch out that you are not deceived. For many will come in my name, claiming, 'I am he', and, 'the time is nigh.' Do not follow them. When you hear of wars and revolutions, do not be frightened. These things must happen first, but the end will not come right away.' Later, in verse 32, he continues, 'I tell you the truth, this generation will certainly not pass away until all these things have happened...' This largely repeats the similar discourse found in Matthew 24 with the interesting exception that the mention of the destruction of Jerusalem does not feature in Matthew leading to the possible conclusion that the additional reference was included to explain the events of the intervening years and to lend a more prophetic note to Jesus' teaching. Jesus would seem here to be attempting to distance himself from the contemporary view of an imminent divine intervention and this section is certainly compact and unequivocal in comparison with the myriad references to the kingdom of spiritual regeneration for which the individual can be prepared by dint of following the teachings of Jesus and having faith in the redemptive message.
0

#3 User is offline   rev c watson 

  • Senior Member
  • Icon
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 106
  • Joined: 22-September 11
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northwood, OH
  • Interests:Family, ministry, learning, riding my Harley, fishing

Posted 20 July 2013 - 12:24 PM

He preached of a loving and compassionate God, not one of picking and choosing. More or less you choose your own fate. There is forgiveness for everyone! If you want an early "Rapture" ride your bicycle in and out of traffic on a busy street and you will meet him! I personally will stay and experience heaven on earth until my time is up!!! :coffee:

I would like to go on the record and state that what I read in this lesson about other peoples "loony ideas' was uncalled for and juvenile, if we are to follow his only "clear" message of "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you"! Unless you like being insulted?
0

#4 User is offline   jdania 

  • Member
  • Icon
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 14
  • Joined: 21-September 15
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Puerto Rico

Posted 29 December 2015 - 12:56 AM

Historical Jesus Lesson 16
Written by Rev. Lisa A. Morris
Points to Ponder

1. From what we have learned so far, did Jesus say that watchfulness meant waiting for signs of what modern day fundamentalists call the rapture?
I don’t think so. Jesus was preaching about the arrival of the Kingdom of God. About a spiritual kingdom where we would be liberated from evil. The Kingdom Jesus spoke about was not of this world and it was not going to accept people of flesh and blood, so he could not have been thinking or speaking about what modern day fundamentalist call the rapture.
2. Was Jesus speaking of God as a God of wrath?
No, Jesus was speaking of a God of compassion, forgiveness and love.
3. Didn’t Jesus teach that God was no longer the wrathful God of the Old Testament?
Yes, he did.
4. Did not Jesus say that God’s “kingdom” meaning salvation, liberation and compassion was near and that God was a God of compassion?
Yes, he spoke about change and that the God they were expecting who was supposed to come and punished the ones who had not repented, the sinner was not the God of his time, of his Kingdom. God was compassionate, one who would bring salvation and liberation from evil.

jdania
0

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic