Universal Life Church/ULC Seminary Forum Home: Lessons 13 & 14 - Universal Life Church/ULC Seminary Forum Home

Jump to content

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Lessons 13 & 14 Wiccan Mythology

#1 User is offline   dsurvivor 

  • Advanced Member
  • Icon
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 439
  • Joined: 30-August 08

Posted 15 January 2010 - 10:48 AM

I have combined these. Both were wonderful studies. About myths, I did read about the use of myths in a business book on leadership. Found similar principles there. Lesson 13 requires one find a myth (ancient or modern) and evaluate it.

Tarzan! How about that myth! I am not considering the movies of Tarzan. I read all of Edgar Rice Burrough's novels as a teen. Tarzan was based upon ERB's time - late 1890's to 1940's - when ideas of new worlds and evolution were popular. He took the idea of the "noble savage" and wrote about what might happen if an infant were raised in the wilds of the jungle. This person would then develop in a "purer" natural environment without the "evils" of the materialistic world. It is a type of Hercules story. Tarzan was raised by the "great apes" (neither gorilla nor chimp) being adopted by a grieving mother ape who found his parents dead. In that ape culture he was weaker and a misfit and in some ways he was superior. This would be the paradox he would grow up. When he finds a knife, he finds an equalizer. His ability to learn and speak would set him apart. Using tools and natural "wisdom" he befriends an elephant, he soon discovers man in a local tribe of Africans, and then begins a self-discovery of himself. When white people arrive from his parent's country, he is challenged. The first novel ends with Tarzan discovering he is royalty, the woman he comes to love is engaged, and that he does not fit anywhere. The sequel is the journey of redemption. It is a battle for identity. It requires some acceptance of who he is, what is worth fighting for, and what is worth giving up. He existed before "Superman" but he embodies the same ideas and struggles. Tarzan appears god-like in many ways but is still human. One thing about Tarzan that struck me is that he had core values that come across as noble and good. Though tempted, he rarely gave in to evil.

Again, that is just my simple analysis. :biggrinthumb: Others may disagree...but what are modern myths for? :coffee:
0

#2 User is offline   rev mark 

  • Advanced Member
  • Icon
  • Group: Moderators
  • Posts: 729
  • Joined: 12-September 04
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:s.mich/n.ind.

Posted 16 January 2010 - 09:27 AM

i can think of another myth that comes close to this,but i digress.well written answer,and your point about tarzen well presented and supported.
0

Page 1 of 1
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic