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Lesson 17 Christian Church Wins Some and Looses Some Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Rev. Dr. Gary 

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Posted 30 July 2008 - 07:14 PM

This is for questions pertaining to Lesson 17.

1. What were the new threats to Christianity at this time?

2. What were the consequences of the spread of Islam to the Christian church and to Europe?

3. Is it true or not true that when an internal row foments between people of two different kinds of Christianity within a country (like what happened in Spain in the 8th century A.D.), it makes it easier for outside invaders of another religion altogether to overrun the country? Why or why not?
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#2 User is offline   Frank Selden 

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Posted 26 March 2009 - 07:31 AM

[quote name='Rev. Dr. Gary' post='51291' date='Jul 31 2008, 03:14 AM']This is for questions pertaining to Lesson 17.

1. What were the new threats to Christianity at this time?

The Western church slowed Islam with a military victory at Tours in A.D. 732. The Spanish Roman Catholic monarchs Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castille and León finally kicked the Muslims out of Spain in 1492. The Western church also faced invasion from Scandinavian Vikings after the 8th century A.D. The Western church spread its resources thin by evangelizing the Gospel among the Teutonic tribes and the tribes in Spain, North Africa, and Italy who had accepted the unorthodox Arian Christianity.
The Eastern church faced a nearly overwhelming threat of Islamic war. Islam overran most of the Byzantine Eastern Empire and was finally turned back by Byzantine Emperor Leo III by A.D. 718. The Eastern church also was threatened later by Slavs, Magyars, and Mongols.

2. What were the consequences of the spread of Islam to the Christian church and to Europe?

Western and Eastern Christianity became weak through the losses of people and real estate to Islam. The North African church vanished. Egypt and the Holy Land were lost. The Eastern church barely managed to keep the Muslim hordes from overrunning Constantinople until 1453. The Western church fared better in northwestern Europe through its mission activity. The Roman pontiff increased in power as rival patriarchs of Alexandria and Antioch were under the thumb of Islam and could no longer speak for their respective churches. Islam resisted the Roman pontiff and later the Crusaders in their attempts to recapture the Holy Land, a series of wars which nearly bankrupted Europe and cost the lives of many of its best leaders.
The Eastern church also lost authority when it allowed Islam to partially define its doctrines through the issue of whether pictorial images can be used in churches. This issue, called iconoclasm, surfaced in part because the Muslims were accusing Christians of idolatry (worshiping the images in their churches).

3. Is it true or not true that when an internal row foments between people of two different kinds of Christianity within a country (like what happened in Spain in the 8th century A.D.), it makes it easier for outside invaders of another religion altogether to overrun the country? Why or why not?

When an internal row foments between people of two different kinds of one religion within a country it makes it easier for outside invaders of another religion altogether to overrun the country. This is demonstrated by events in Spain in the 8th century (Christian division) and by the American invasion of Iraq (Islamic division) in 2003. In Spain rows began between the orthodox and the Arians made it much easier for the Muslims to overrun Spain. American President Bush identified both Iraq and Iran as part of an axis of evil but only invaded Iraq. One of the reasons is that US intelligence showed Iraq did not possess the Iranian singular religious and anti-American fervor. The Kurdish division in northern Iraq allowed the US an automatic stronghold within Iraq
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#3 User is offline   graham 

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 08:22 AM

1. What were the new threats to Christianity at this time?

Having previously confronted the challenges of persecution and internal discord in the early phase of its development, the Christian church now faced attack from powerful forces who wished to destroy both its political and religious hegemony. The most significant, and most enduring, of these was Islam which began to represent a serious threat, especially in the East, soon after the death of its founder, Mohammed. Viking attacks on western Europe and later problems with Slavs, Magyars and Mongols in the east were less protracted and in many cases partly absorbed, although still locally dangerous. In France, the Muslim progress was halted at Tours in 732 but in Spain it established a permanent presence and sphere of influence until the Reconquista under the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand and Isabella. Missionary activity carried on, nevertheless, and achieved considerable success in Northen Europe.

2. What were the consequences of the spread of Islam on the Christian Church and Europe?

Islam began a process of aggressive expansion after 632 with considerable success, as noted above. Syria, Egypt,
Palestine, Persia and North Africa and southern Spain came under its thrall. This impacted considerably upon the religious and cultural landscape; in areas such as science, medicine, astronomy, law, etc. Islamic culture was vibrant and inventive but, in geo-political terms the consequences were confrontation and conflict as in the Crusades for example. The Fall of Constantinople in 1453 to the Ottoman Turks (Sunni muslims) under Suleiman the Magnificent inaugurated an expansion from Anatolia into the Balkans which provoked centuries of conflict with the western powers and laid the seeds of later horrific events such as those provoked by the disintegration of the former Yugoslavia in the 1990's. Paradoxically, the Roman pontiffs benefitted from this as their potential patriarchal rivals in the east were subsumed by Islam and lost any claim to co-equal authority. Further spiritual authority was lost by the eastern church in clashes with Islam over religious issues such as the accusation of iconolatry where the church had to submit to muslim arbitration. A new phase of islamic militancy discernible in the present age, will possibly afford us further insight into this question over the coming decades!

3. Is it true or not that whenever internal strife divides people of two different brands of Christianity (especially as in Spain in C8 AD), it makes it easier for outside invaders of another religion to overrun the country? Why or why not?

Abraham Lincoln famously declared that 'A house divided against itself cannot stand', and it is difficult to argue against this as regards the effect upon the unity and sense of purpose of those facing the threat. The term 'Fifth column' has frequently been used to describe seditious internal movements that have assisted the efforts of the potential conqueror. It is arguable, though, that religious divisions need not always produce this effect and that much depends upon the religion of the invader and upon the depth of animosity between the indigenous persuasions. In the early middle ages, it is likely to have been an accurate description given that adherents of a splinter group within the same religion were usually subjected to much greater intolerance than the infidels who were not in a position to know the right way. It did, however vary from place to place; in Spain, the clash between orthodox and Arian dissenters engendered great hatred and weakened their response to attack whereas in Britain, the contacts between Celtic and Roman Catholic Christians were more civilised and more likely to be settled by synod than by the sword.
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#4 User is offline   dsurvivor 

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Posted 20 April 2009 - 08:40 PM

1. What were the new threats to Christianity at this time?

A. Islam.
B. Arian Chrisitanity.

2. What were the consequences of the spread of Islam to the Christian church and to Europe?

The Eastern branch of the church lost many people, property, and wealth to Islam. The Eastern Church was in survival mode. The Western Church fared a bit better and was able to eventually slow down the Islamic threat. The Muslims also accused the Easter church of idol worship which caused some internal divisions within the church. The power of the church began shifting to the west.

3. Is it true or not true that when an internal row foments between people of two different kinds of Christianity within a country (like what happened in Spain in the 8 th century A.D.), it makes it easier for outside invaders of another religion altogether to overrun the country? Why or why not?

Sometime it causes a division. But also when outsiders attempt to invade it can cause internal groups to unite against a common enemy.
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#5 User is offline   rev mark 

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 05:13 PM

View Postdsurvivor, on Apr 20 2009, 09:40 PM, said:

1. What were the new threats to Christianity at this time?

A. Islam.
B. Arian Chrisitanity.

2. What were the consequences of the spread of Islam to the Christian church and to Europe?

The Eastern branch of the church lost many people, property, and wealth to Islam. The Eastern Church was in survival mode. The Western Church fared a bit better and was able to eventually slow down the Islamic threat. The Muslims also accused the Easter church of idol worship which caused some internal divisions within the church. The power of the church began shifting to the west.

3. Is it true or not true that when an internal row foments between people of two different kinds of Christianity within a country (like what happened in Spain in the 8 th century A.D.), it makes it easier for outside invaders of another religion altogether to overrun the country? Why or why not?

Sometime it causes a division. But also when outsiders attempt to invade it can cause internal groups to unite against a common enemy.


ok,what happens when there is an internal divison within a denomanation that causes a group to break away(ie:the catholic church and the church of england)and no outside forces are there to influence it?

2nd question,why do you feel islam is a threat to christianity?
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#6 User is offline   dsurvivor 

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Posted 21 April 2009 - 06:40 PM

View Postrev mark, on Apr 21 2009, 06:13 PM, said:

View Postdsurvivor, on Apr 20 2009, 09:40 PM, said:

1. What were the new threats to Christianity at this time?

A. Islam.
B. Arian Chrisitanity.

2. What were the consequences of the spread of Islam to the Christian church and to Europe?

The Eastern branch of the church lost many people, property, and wealth to Islam. The Eastern Church was in survival mode. The Western Church fared a bit better and was able to eventually slow down the Islamic threat. The Muslims also accused the Easter church of idol worship which caused some internal divisions within the church. The power of the church began shifting to the west.

3. Is it true or not true that when an internal row foments between people of two different kinds of Christianity within a country (like what happened in Spain in the 8 th century A.D.), it makes it easier for outside invaders of another religion altogether to overrun the country? Why or why not?

Sometime it causes a division. But also when outsiders attempt to invade it can cause internal groups to unite against a common enemy.


ok,what happens when there is an internal divison within a denomanation that causes a group to break away(ie:the catholic church and the church of england)and no outside forces are there to influence it?

That is probably a question for Church History Part II (which occurs after 1000 AD - this course I believe goes to the split of the Roman and Orthodox churches. You and I know the answer to that question. People fuss, fight, and feud.

2nd question,why do you feel islam is a threat to christianity?



It is not a matter of feeling. It was a fact in context of the lesson. When Islam began expanding in the 7th & 8th centuries, they were a real threat. It was an aggressive religion in the beginning. There is no separation of state and religion for Islam. I lived in the Middle East for 2 years among the Muslims. Many are wonderful people...but there are groups (a large percentage) who are very fundamental in their views.
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#7 User is offline   rev mark 

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Posted 28 April 2009 - 12:32 PM

ah,ok.you are right,in most islamic countries,seperation of church and state is nonexistent.i should remember that.

my second question was not adressed,but it isn't importent.
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#8 User is offline   Edward lindsay 

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 09:37 PM

1. The biggest threat was Islam latter it was Slavs,Magyars, and Mongols.


2. It wiped out the north African Church the church of Augustine. It eventually completely conquered the Byzantine Empire with the fall of Constantinople in 1453 and made the Eastern Church under Islamic political rule.


3. I believe it does because you divide and conquer your opponent basically giving them the option of your religion or death.
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#9 User is offline   AmyLong 

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 08:45 PM

1. The threats of other beliefs. There was Islam, vikings, Slavs, Magyars, Mongols, Pagans, and Ari an Christianity.


2. The Eastern church lost a lot of people and a lot of it's wealth. Islam even managed to bring about divisions among the church followers themselves. The Western church stood stronger and fa ired better. This making the Western Church more powerful.

3. Usually it is true. Because when there is a division it makes both sides then weaker and more vulnerable to outside influences. But sometimes it is enough to reunite the division and make them stronger for a stronger common goal.
Gwen Simpson
I have been ordained through the Universal Life Church , and I post spiritual articles at ULC and at the Universal Life Church Seminary course listings. I'm also a martial artist and I teach Sacramento Martial Arts. I support the Universal Life Church Article Directory, and have blogs that contain ULC Seminary Essays and Wedding Ceremonies.
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#10 User is offline   William 

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 12:37 PM

1. The biggest threat was that Islam was on the rise in the Byzantine empire..... Christianity was losing a foothold in the east with the monotheism of the Prophet Mohammed


2. The threats related to Islam were that Christianity would become obsolete in the Middle East. The northern Tier of Africa was lost to Islam as well as Constantinople in1456. The west was able to hang on and many attemps though the crusades tried to place Christianity back in the Eastern empire having an adverse affect even today.



3. When there is a row between individuals of a particular religion it segregates a belief system. This opens the idea of a divided house cannot stand. It allows for other powerful ideas to become prominent and may lead to a societal and cultural change.
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