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Lesson 16 Pope Gregory I [the Great]: Bridge between Ancient and Medieval Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Rev. Dr. Gary 

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 09:02 AM

This is for questions pertaining to Lesson 16.

1. What made medieval church history different from ancient church history?

2. Did the pontificate of Pope Gregory I (the Great) truly usher the Christian church into the medieval period? Why or Why not?

3. What were Pope Gregory I

This post has been edited by Rev. Dr. Gary: 30 July 2008 - 08:40 AM

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#2 User is offline   Frank Selden 

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:33 AM

[quote name='Rev. Dr. Gary' post='51279' date='Jul 29 2008, 05:02 PM']This is for questions pertaining to Lesson 16.

1. What made medieval church history different from ancient church history?

The transition from ancient to medieval church history involved:
- Christianity stopped suffering official Roman persecution
- the Battle of Adrianople paved the way for the Visigoths to overrun the Roman Empire
- the Roman Empire finally fell. Yet there is a plausible reason for the dividing line being placed at the accession of Pope Gregory I in A.D. 590 because the beginning of his papacy - the former Roman Empire had split into Muslim North Africa, Byzantine Asia Minor, and European papal areas
- The interaction between church and state became very important.
- Medieval church history took place upon a much wider stage than ancient church history

2. Did the pontificate of Pope Gregory I (the Great) truly usher the Christian church into the medieval period? Why or Why not?

Pope Gregory I is certainly one of the most notable figures in Ecclesiastical History. He has exercised in many respects a momentous influence on the doctrine, the organization, and the discipline of the Catholic Church. To him we must look for an explanation of the religious situation of the Middle Ages; indeed, if no account were taken of his work, the evolution of the form of medieval Christianity would be almost inexplicable. "In so far as the modern Catholic system is a legitimate development of medieval Catholicism, of this too Gregory may not unreasonably be termed the Father. Almost all the leading principles of the later Catholicism are found, at any rate in germ, in Gregory the Great." (F.H. Dudden, "Gregory the Great", 1, p. v).

He impressed upon men's minds to an unprecedented degree the fact that the See of Peter was the one supreme, decisive authority in the Catholic Church. During his pontificate, he established close relations between the Church of Rome and those of Spain, Gaul, Africa, and Illyricum, while his influence in Britain was such that he is justly called the Apostle of the English. In the Eastern Churches, too, the papal authority was exercised with a frequency unusual before his time, and we find no less an authority than the Patriarch of Alexandria submitting himself humbly to the pope's "commands". The system of appeals to Rome was firmly established, and the pope is found to veto or confirm the decrees of synods, to annul the decisions of patriarchs, and inflict punishment on ecclesiastical dignitaries precisely as he thinks right.

If the medieval period is synonymous with a ecclesiastical and secular empire-wide recognition of papal authority then Pope Gregory I did usher in that age.

3. What were Pope Gregory I
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#3 User is offline   graham 

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 09:38 AM

1. What made mediaeval church history different from ancient church history?

The principal differences between the early church and the mediaeval church were many: secure status and freedom from persecution, the political void occasioned by the collapse of the Roman Empire which left a power vacuum in Italy and the opportunity to exercise influence throughout western Europe and North Africa, a hierarchical structure which rendered the process of asserting discipline over clergy and laity much easier and the tradition that Rome, and especially the Pope, was the arbiter of any disputes over doctrine. This is a mature church that has learnt much, and inherited much, from its close association with the Roman state and its exercise of power.

2. Does the pontificate of Pope Gregory I (the Great) truly usher the Christian church into the mediaeval period? Why of why not?

The development of the church was, of course, an evolutionary and architectonic process but, nonetheless, the pontificate of Gregory I does seem to represent a watershed and to prefigure many of the salient features of the Roman Catholic Church over the next millennium. The power and prestige of Rome, within both the religious and secular spheres, was greatly enhanced by Gregory and becomes a blueprint for the later Roman catholic imperium that was able to challenge and often overawe secular rulers.

3. What were Pope Gregory I's contributions and how did they form the foundations for what the Christian church, particularly the Roman Catholic Church, would become in the mediaeval period?

Gregory himself was a synthesis of classical and Christian civilisation, of patrician confidence and monastic simplicity, and a man indifferent to wealth and pomp. His strong missionary zeal went hand in hand with his desire to expand papal power by appointing bishops and sending the papal pallium from Rome and resisting attempts by other patriarchs such as John of Constantinople to enhance their own status and prestige. His devotion to the cure of souls is seen in his Book of Pastoral Care which enjoins good practice on the bishops. The papal territories in Italy were greatly increased in extent and were made prosperous and wealthy under his rule. During the later mediaeval period, the Pope's role as a territorial prince ruling over these territories was to be a characteristic of the Church and to draw it into power politics. Gregory himself initiated the practice of raising papal armies to enforce his will, a harbinger of the career of Leo X who was to lead the papal armies into battle centuries later. Pope Gregory also legated to the mediaeval church the main elements of doctrine and liturgy including the Gregorian chant, more controversial issues such as free will, single predestination, the parity of scripture and tradition and the value of good works, many of which were to become contentious issues later. It is, therefore, clear that Gregory did indeed govern and reform the church in such a way as to give it the identity that we associate with the mediaeval period.

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#4 User is offline   dsurvivor 

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Posted 12 April 2009 - 03:12 PM

1. What made medieval church history different from ancient church history?

In ancient church history, the church was growing and moving under the shadow of the Roman Empire. The church was more
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#5 User is offline   sperwal09 

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Posted 30 November 2009 - 08:48 AM

Thank you very much for answering There will be a little of "real life" in my work. If someone has more or other ideas, they are welcome
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#6 User is offline   Edward lindsay 

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Posted 21 April 2010 - 08:53 PM

1. Christianity stopped suffering official Roman persecution and a new Ara of power for the Western Church


2. Yes Pope Gregory I did usher in the medieval period he joined classical and the medieval Church together, He was a symbol of the new medieval world as culture became an institutionalized within the Church.


3. His greatest accomplishments was the expansion of Papal power and brought Christianity to England also the development of sacramental hierarchy and the foundation of Christian doctrine.
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#7 User is offline   AmyLong 

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Posted 21 June 2010 - 08:40 PM

1. The mi devil church was unorganized and had no set authority that was organized. But Pope Gregory started to organize the church and it's laity and structure giving the ancient church a different distinction.

2. Yes because he set the structure for the church as it is today. He gave the papal office the great power that it has today.

3. He helped to join the old church and the new. He did extraordinary things and had great accomplishments. He brought the papal office to it's high standard. He gave the Catholic church structure that it maintains today, and he brought Christianity to England.
Gwen Simpson
I have been ordained through the Universal Life Church , and I post spiritual articles at ULC and at the Universal Life Church Seminary course listings. I'm also a martial artist and I teach Sacramento Martial Arts. I support the Universal Life Church Article Directory, and have blogs that contain ULC Seminary Essays and Wedding Ceremonies.
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#8 User is offline   William 

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 11:45 AM

1. The religious power centers began to shift. Christianity was more controlled from the Western Civilized world. Rome was beginning to wane as a dominant force and Islam was on the rise.

2. He was the transitional leader of the Roman Catholic world. His piety and sacrifice was welcomed and he assumed leadership of church leaders without formal authority.

3. He was a prolific writer leaving over 800 letters. No other pope dare cross Pope Gregory. He also changed the canon of the mass.
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