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Lesson 11 Christian Church Parleys with the State and Preaches to the Barbarians Rate Topic: -----

#1 User is offline   Rev. Dr. Gary 

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 08:50 AM

This is for questions pertaining to Lesson 11.

1. How was Christianity

This post has been edited by Rev. Dr. Gary: 30 July 2008 - 08:29 AM

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#2 User is offline   Frank Selden 

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Posted 07 February 2009 - 05:45 AM

[quote name='Rev. Dr. Gary' post='51274' date='Jul 29 2008, 04:50 PM']This is for questions pertaining to Lesson 11.

1. How was Christianity
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#3 User is offline   graham 

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Posted 07 March 2009 - 09:10 AM

1. How was Christianity's favourable relationship with the state from the time of Constantine both a blessing and a curse?

The favour shown to the Christian community by successive Roman emperors during the two centuries after the conversion of Constantine conferred immense prestige, wealth and influence on the church out of all proportion to their numbers within the empire. Magnificent buildings and wealth, a developing hierarchy, an evolving and authoritative body of doctrine and the power to persecute pagans and heretics, all these factors accelerated the evolution of a formalised pan-european church from a localised sect based upon simple faith and worship. When the 'barbarian' Teutonic tribes began their wave of invasions and conquest, the impressive nature of the Christian Church and its apparent interconnection with earthly political power, commended it to the invaders who saw it as a force for unity and cohesion so that conversion was often an amalgam of expediency and genuine spiritual commitment. The process of conversion was rapid in many cases and this brought with it considerable problems; pagan tribes who converted en masse at the behest of their rulers were not always properly schooled and were wont to retain many of their old ways. The rituals, beliefs and forms of worship to which they were accustomed were often absorbed into Christian practice and needed to be addressed at a later stage when they were seen to threaten the purity and integrity of the Christian church.

On a more far-reaching level, the adoption of Christianity by the Roman Empire as the equivalent of a state religion radically altered the nature of the 'primitive' church and certainly accelerated, perhaps even distorted, its natural evolution. Power from above, supported by an elaborate hierarchy and characterised by the panoply of wealth, became a defining feature and the role of the emperor as an arbiter in matters spiritual as well as temporal created a disturbing precedent which was to occasion conflict between Church and State in many shapes and forms over the coming centuries.

2. Where the barbarians the foundation for subsequent Wester European civilisation only because of their Christianity?
Why, or why not?

The Barbarian invaders brought with them a variety of cultural baggage in many shapes and forms and there has been much research over recent decades which seeks to establish, with considerable success, that they were much more culturally advanced and organised than was suggested in Christian propagandist writings. No doubt, the Dark ages would have been possessed of a different culture if the process of conversion to Christianity had been less rapid or unsupported by the example of the Roman state which the invaders tended to admire and emulate even as they sought to overthrow its political and military power. Roman civilisation had already achieved untold splendours and achievements in virtually all aspects of human life, such as hygiene, architecture, medicine, education, communications, law and order, science, etc. long before the advent of Christianity. It is not , therefore, improbable that an alternative dispensation might have evolved that would have resulted in a vibrant cultural renaissance based once again upon a pan-theistic approach.

3. After Christianity came to Ireland, how did they maintain the light of culture during the Dark Ages?

As suggested above, it might be more appropriate to see the period after the decline of the Roman Empire as not so much lacking in culture but 'differently cultured'. Ireland adopted Christianity but then remained, to an extent, in a time warp because of her isolation from more violent events in other parts of Europe especially after the withdrawal of the Romans from England and Wales. A simpler and more eccentric form of Christian faith and practice continued there although occasional clashes such as that over the dating of Easter were resolved at meetings of representatives of the Celtic and Roman churches such as that at Whitby in 670 when (significantly) the decision to adopt the Roman practice in his kingdom was taken by Oswy King of Northumbria.
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#4 User is offline   dsurvivor 

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 07:49 AM

1. How was Christianity
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#5 User is offline   Edward lindsay 

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 03:57 AM

1.It helped with protection, elevated status and finical aid the major drawback was the state demanded more say in spiritual and theological matters, in that time the Christian Church gained power and persecuted pagans.

2. No, It was through the conversion of the earlier barbarians that helped with the conversion over to the Western European Civilization.

3. They centered themselves around monasteries in tribal areas and became a center of culture where the monks became missionaries and scholars and were sent to work all around the country.
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#6 User is offline   Edward lindsay 

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 04:48 AM

1. They differed by the fields of study used by the east and they were very good at translation of scripture, the writings of pagan philosophers and the writings of theological treatises were important parts of the works.

2. It's the best source of knowledge of teachings for the first three centuries of the history of the ancient church.


3 He was a able polemicist,a good preacher,very good theologian and he created a Christian historiography that is still used today. He devoted his life to to episcopal oversight, studying, and writing he is known as the greatest of the church fathers and he left over 100 books 500 sermons and 200 letters behind. The protestants vied him as proto-reformation and humanity bound by sin needs salvation. And for the Catholics he developed purgatory, and emphasized Baptism and the Eucharist,along with Baptismal regeneration and sacramental grace.
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#7 User is offline   AmyLong 

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 11:09 AM

1. It was a blessing because they obtained protection, respect, elevated status, and financial aid. But the state then had more say in the religion.

2. Yes it was the mass conversion of them to Christianity that lead to this. Because there were so many they began to cover the continent.

3. St. Patrick organized the Christian religion in Ireland. Despite the Druid region he made the religion strong.


Gwen Simpson
I have been ordained through the Universal Life Church , and I post spiritual articles at ULC and at the Universal Life Church Seminary course listings. I'm also a martial artist and I teach Sacramento Martial Arts. I support the Universal Life Church Article Directory, and have blogs that contain ULC Seminary Essays and Wedding Ceremonies.
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#8 User is offline   AmyLong 

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 05:15 PM

Master of Christian History - Lesson #11 (Preaching to the Barbarians)
by Bro. Jim DeManche



1. How was Christianity’s favorable relationship with the state from the time of Constantine both a blessing and a curse?



To understand church-state relations at the time of Constantine, one must understand what the emperor was facing at the time he took the imperial throne. The chaos that ruined the Roman Republic between 133 B.C. and 31 B.C. was stopped by the powerful rule of Octavian (Caesar Augustus) after he had destroyed Mark Antony’s army. Yet the power-sharing arrangement that Octavian established with the Roman Senate was far too weak to face internal rottenness and the threat of barbarians on the empire’s borders. The peace and prosperity of this early era lead into another century of chaos between A.D. 192 and A.D. 284. In A.D. 285 Emperor Diocletian rearranged the empire as an autocracy, modeled after oriental despots, to form a safeguard for Greco-Roman culture. Since Christianity was deemed a threat to this culture, Diocletian, prodded by Galerius, tried but failed to stamp out Christianity between A.D. 303 and A.D. 305. His later successor Constantine realized that Christianity could not be exterminated. It would be better to have Christianity be an ally in the salvation of classical culture. Christianity’s parley with the state began when Constantine obtained complete control of the state. Though officially he shared power with his co-emperor Licinius, Constantine made most of the important determinations of state policy.





2. Were the barbarians the foundation for subsequent Western European civilization only because of their conversion to Christianity? Why or Why not?



Barbarian Goths first appeared on the Danube River in the latter part of the 4th century A.D. They were pursued by Mongol tribes, so they asked the Roman authorities for permission to enter the Roman Empire. The battle of Adrianople between them and the Romans in A.D. 378 led to the death of Emperor Valens and the incursion of the Arian Visigoths (West Goths) into the eastern part of the empire. Many people crossed the Danube River after that battle and started their migrations within the empire. After sacking Rome in A.D. 410, they founded a kingdom around A.D. 426 in Spain. Later came Arian Vandals from east of the Rhine who ended up in North Africa. The Arian Ostrogoths took over the leadership of the defunct Roman Empire under Theodoric. The Arian Lombards and Burgundians and pagan Franks crossed the Rhine and settled during the 5th century A.D. in what is now modern-day France. Anglo-Saxons settled in England. The same century also saw the Western Church facing a brief but terrible threat from the invading Mongol Huns led by Attila the Hun. The Huns were finally driven back by the victory at Chalons in A.D. 451. The Christian church was winning many of the Teutonic tribes to Christ, but new threats came in the form of Muslims and Arian Lombards in the 6th century A.D. The invasions of fresh and vigorous barbarians into what was once the Roman Empire did not in and of itself create what would become Western European civilization. That only came about through the mass conversions of those same barbarians to Christ.





3. After Christianity came to Ireland, how did they maintain the light of culture during the Dark Ages?



Patrick (c. A.D. 389-A.D. 461), later to become the patron saint of Ireland, was taken from Britain to Ireland by pirates at age 16. He lived there, tending cattle, for six years. Upon returning to his homeland, he was led to labor among the people of Ireland as a missionary. From A.D. 432 to A.D. 461 he worked among the Celts of Ireland. Despite the efforts of the priests of the the Druid religion, Patrick made the island a strong center of Celtic Christianity. He organized the Christians around monasteries in the tribal areas. During the Dark Ages in Europe, Ireland was a center of culture from which monks as missionaries and scholars were sent to work on the continent. It was from Ireland that Columbia went to convert the Scots to Christianity.
I have been ordained through the Universal Life Church , and I post spiritual articles at ULC and at the Universal Life Church Seminary course listings. I'm also a martial artist and I teach Sacramento Martial Arts. I support the Universal Life Church Article Directory, and have blogs that contain ULC Seminary Essays and Wedding Ceremonies.
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#9 User is offline   djuliano67 

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:47 PM

1. It freed them from the prosecution and gave them full freedom with a prominent position in the empire. This also mean
that they had to do things they were "asked" to do and bend the rules and values a bit to accommodate their new benefactors.

2. I believe it could be argued that they did because in in the dark ages it was many of these once pagan and barbaric peoples they were the ones who helped keep the knowledge alive by copying texts and protecting them until the elightenment.

3. During the dark ages this was the hub of learning where minks and scholars came to study.
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#10 User is offline   William 

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 11:39 AM

1. COnstantine viewed Christianity as a way to unite the people under his rule. He waited until his just before his death to be Babtized and held many non christian beliefs during his life. He brought many christian beliefs to the mainstrean but allowed persecution of pagan beliefs and at times supported those ideologies. He was a politician first.
2. Barbarians were first and foremost pagans. It was the fall of the Roman Empire and barbaic hords taht migrated. The Christian church was a unifcation and conversion tool used to bring Christianity to the masses.
3. They employed monks and the monasteries to reach out to the pagan hero worshipers. This was good except many of these heresies infiltrate the church as we know it today. like hero or sain worship.
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