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Comparative Religion 13

#1 User is offline   Rev. Kelley 

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Posted 13 June 2016 - 03:49 PM

Comparative Religion Architecture
The link was to the Cathedral's labyrinth in San Francisco. The space is used for holy ceremonies and prayers, as well as for meditations, yoga, and candle lit walking classes. It is intentionally a two way path so people pass and meet others on their own meditative walk on the path.
Three stages of the walk
• Purgation (Releasing) ~ A releasing, a letting go of the details of your life. This is the act of shedding thoughts and distractions. A time to open the heart and quiet the mind.
• Illumination (Receiving) ~ When you reach the center, stay there as long as you like. It is a place of meditation and prayer. Receive what is there for you to receive.
• Union (Returning) ~ As you leave, following the same path out of the center as you came in, you enter the third stage, which is joining God, your Higher Power, or the healing forces at work in the world. Each time you walk the labyrinth you become more empowered to find and do the work for which you feel your soul is reaching.

Of course now I'm interested in actually seeing the Forbidden City after learning about the design.

"The Forbidden City of Beijing was sited and designed entirely according to feng shui principles".
Mostly, I feel like watching National Treasure, Indiana Jones, or Tombraider after reading about the design implementations in the religious architecture.
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#2 User is offline   Dr Richard 

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 01:47 PM

I will certainly reconsider the architecture of religious sites now. I always just considered the functuality of buildings, not the symbolic meaning behind the builder. Is there a purpose to how it is made? this is a question I will now ask myself.
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